Command Voice vs “Invisible” Commands


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Command Voice vs “Invisible” Commands

The Command Voice training dogs

When offering commands to a pet, a calm, company, reliable voice is most effective. Pets do not respond well to reluctant, pleading voices, nor to screaming, which may sound to the dog like threatening barking or scolding. It is likewise important that the word used for the command and the pitch of the voice be consistent each time the command is provided so that the pet dog can more easily discover exactly what the owner suggests (” siiiiiiiiiiiit” does not sound the like “sit”, for instance).

Using the pet dog’s name prior to a command ensures that the dog knows that a command is coming, that it is for him (rather than for other canines, children, or people), and that he needs to focus. This is important because pets hear a lot of human speech that has no importance for them at all, and it is simple for them to overlook commands amongst the babble.

To reinforce the command, the pet constantly gets some sort of reward or support (appreciation and generally a treat or toy) when it performs the action correctly. This helps the canine to understand that he has done an advantage.

Note that not all pet dogs are trained to voice command. Numerous working types of pet are not trained to a voice command at all; they are taught to follow a mix of whistles and hand signals. Deaf dogs are completely efficient in learning how to follow visual signals alone. Lots of obedience classes teach hand signals for typical commands in addition to voice signals; these signals can be helpful in quiet scenarios, at a distance, and in sophisticated obedience competitors.

The particular command words are trivial, although typical words in English consist of sit, down, come, and stay. Short, clear words that are quickly comprehended by other people are generally advised; that way, individuals will comprehend what a handler is telling his dog to do and other handlers have a great chance of controlling another person’s pet if required. In fact, canines can find out commands in any language or other interactions medium, consisting of whistles, mouth noises, hand gestures, etc.

Unnoticeable Commands

Pets can in some cases react to subtle variations in the body movement of the owner.

Here’s 2 examples:

1.) Lots of owners tend to start bending over before telling their pet dog the, “Down” command. Because of this, the canine starts to cue off the owner’s body movement and puts down anytime the owner flexes over … but not if the owner stands directly and releases the command!

Service: Always offer the command FIRST, before bending over and making the pet do it. This way, the pet will link the habits with the command, rather than with your body language.

2.) Amateur handlers have the tendency to tell their canine “Heel,” and then walk with

their shoulders angled back to their canine, so that they can look at their canine while they’re strolling.

The issue with this is that the pet dog reads your body language and attempts to align himself with your shoulders, thus dragging the owner, instead of walking in the heel position (aligned with your left heal.).

Solution: Keep both shoulders straight forward as you stroll. If you need to look at your pet dog (you should) … cock your head, without angling your shoulders. This will keep your pet dog lined up best along with you.

In general it is handy if you can be aware of how your body movement affects your canine.

 

Command Voice, Command Voice Exercises

Dog Under Voice Control, Dog Voice Alarm, Dog Voice Commands, Dog Voice Effect, Dog Voice In Up, Dog Voice Recognition, Dog Voice Sound Effect, Dog Voice Training

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Command Voice vs “Invisible” Commands

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